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Centre for Young Scientists
The Day for Young Scientists

The Day for Young Scientists

Led by the Vice-Rector for Research and Young Scientists, Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, the Centre for Young Scientists organizes the annual "Day for Young Scientists". The yearly event aims is to shape a culture and identity of young academics. More details are given in the reviews of previous events.

The next Day for Young Scientists is scheduled to take place in November 2023. Detailed information will follow.

Passion and suffering in the doctorate phase

On November 11, 2021, for the eighth time, people interested in doctoral studies, doctoral students and postdocs came together for the digital "Day for Young Scientists". Approximately 80 young scientists took advantage of the opportunity and informed themselves about the numerous topics offered, listened to the reports on their experiences and participated in the open discussion rounds. Main topics of the online event were "Research in a Team," "The Doctoral Process from Different Perspectives," "Career Goal: Professorship!" and "Intercultural Readiness - Arriving in International Research Teams” followed up by discussion rounds. The program was led by Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Vice President for Research and Junior Researchers at Chemnitz University of Technology and Director of the Centre for Young Scientists, as well as Dr. Nadia Lois, Assistant (specialized in Junior Researchers and Tenure-Track-Procedure) in the President´s Office and Managing Director of the Centre for Young Scientists, and Dr. Benny Liebold, Head of International Office of Chemnitz University of Technology.

After the opening and welcoming of the guests, Michael Schmischke (Commissioner of the University Management for Junior Researchers) talked about the current situation of young scientists, pointing out the importance teamwork and exchange between scientists, that are negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this context, he encouraged all those present to feel free to contact him with suggestions or problems and to knock on his (digital or wooden) door.

This opinion was also shared by the participants in the subsequent round of talks. Dr. Julia Grass (Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences), Dr. Kristina Roder (Faculty of Mechanical Engineering), Dr. Sebastian Heil (Faculty of Computer Science), M.A. Jakob Kullik (Faculty of Humanities) and Dr. Leonard Rößner (Faculty of Natural Sciences) shared their personal experiences regarding working and researching in a team during the doctoral studies. The young scientists were able to pass on a wide variety of insights and perspectives on the doctoral phase. For example, Dr. Julia Grass stated that she had met “cool people", whereas Jakob Kullik emphasized the benefits of scholarships. As a fellow of German Business, he was able to report first-hand that networking, especially in business and politics, is more important than ever. Dr. Leonard Rößner also drew a positive conclusion regarding the opportunity to realize his own projects and marked the exchange with international scientists as being very formative for him. Dr. Sebastian Heil highlighted that the exchange with others helps especially in times of low motivation and lean periods, as they can contribute further ideas through new input and other perspectives. With regard to the work and research in the team, Dr. Julia Grass was summed up: "You can't not do research in a team". Jakob Kullik also noted that "with the right people, work can be very fruitful," but it must be well organized. In retrospect, all the referents described the doctoral phase as an extremely positive time that led to meeting many new people and to personal progress as well.

Die Teilnehmer im Gespräch
Young scientists reporting on their doctoral phase; Photo: Screenshot (private)

The second session was entirely dedicated to the topic of "Research in Teams" and was divided into two separate presentations - on the one hand was shown the perspective of the humanities and social sciences, and on the other hand the one of the MINT fields. First, Dr. André Dettmann and Patrick Roßner (Faculty of Mechanical Engineering) presented example concepts for research in teams. These include, among others, the “Arbeitswissenschaftliche Kolloquium (AWIKO)”. It serves the development and acquisition of different skills, such methodological and presentation skills, learning time management and continuous work on the dissertation project. In addition, an interdisciplinary view of issues and the competence of linking knowledge and methods are to be learned. Also, other aspects play a major supportive role during the dissertation project like teamwork, collaboration and networking with research, industry partners and other doctoral students and the informal exchange within the academic area through mutual knowledge.

Afterwards, Prof. Dr. Georg Jahn and Dr. Diana Armbruster (Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences) spoke about methods, opportunities, and possible risks of teamwork. For example, conflicts in teamwork were addressed and how they could be prevented. At the same time, Prof. Jahn pointed out that overcoming conflicts has a motivational effect on group identities and can lead to greater success. Teamwork in science also varies according to discipline and standard. For example, the number of researchers participating in a team depends on the interdisciplinary nature of projects and the scope of the research. Dr. Diana Armbruster also presented the Integrated Research Training Group of the Collaborative Research Center Hybrid Societies as an opportunity, emphasizing the international exchange, the interdisciplinary orientation and funding opportunities in the form of scholarships. Thereby, the community of learners and networking should be strengthened.

Die Teilnehmer im Gespräch
Prof. Dr. Georg Jahn, Dr. Diana Armbruster, Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Dr. André Dettmann and Patrick Roßner are answering questions from the audience; Photo: Screenshot (private)

During the last part of the event the participants could choice to attend one of the three parallel events taking place at the same time. The session "PhD process from different perspectives" was held by Prof. Dr. Silke Hüsing (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration) and Prof. Dr. Martin Gaedke (Dean of the Faculty of Computer Science) and moderated by Dr. Nadia Lois. Prof. Dr. Martin Gaedke described the doctorate as a journey that includes knowledge, failure, success, and fulfillment. It is a paradoxical situation that combines passion and struggle at the same time. Prof. Dr. Silke Hüsing focused on qualities that are necessary for a doctorate. These included reliability, honesty, and discipline. In addition, a list of 15 questions described the path to a doctorate and thus provided tools to make it easier for young scientists to decide consciously and purposefully for or against a doctorate. These questions require personal reflection and, in addition to fundamental questions such as "Why do I want to do a doctorate?", questions such as "Do I want to publish constantly and together with others, or do I want to push ahead with my own major project?" or "What is the significance of the doctorate in this phase of life?" are also asked.

Prof. Dr. Martin Gaedke spoke about the passion and suffering of the doctorate; Photo: Screenshot (private)
In conversation on "The doctoral process from different perspectives": Prof. Dr. Silke Hüsing, Dr. Nadia Lois and Prof. Dr. Martin Gaedke; Photo: Screenshot (private)

In the second parallel event, moderated by Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Prof. Dr. Stefan Garsztecki (Faculty of Humanities) and Prof. Dr. Thomas Seyller (Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences) provided insights into their individual CVs and shared different experiences regarding their own professorship career path. For example, stays abroad, teaching experience, publications, successful acquisition of third-party funding, but also conference participation, committee experience and a good, well-developed network were mentioned as decisive criteria for convincing appointment committees of the personal suitability for the desired professorship. In addition, both professors talked about how they were able to reconcile their professorship with starting a family. In doing so, both professors appealed to the participants to face these questions whenever they should arise and not to let small setbacks stop them from achieving their goal of a doctorate.

Die Teilnehmer im Gespräch
In conversation on the topic "Career goal: Professorship!": Prof. Dr. Thomas Seyller, Prof. Dr. Stefan Garsztecki and Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann; Photo: Screenshot (private)

In the English-language session "Intercultural Readiness - Arriving in International Research Teams", which was moderated by Dr. Benny Liebold, external lecturer Maria Prahl addressed the topic of working in an intercultural team and explained the three important aspects of intercultural effectiveness - "Connect", "Perform", "Enjoy" - and the competencies one should pay attention to balancing when working in an international team. She also illustrated the fundamental similarities and differences between various international academic, scientific, and work cultures.

Whether it was opportunities for funding a doctorate, suggestions for working in a team, or experiences on the path to a professorship, the Day for Young Scientists offered a wide range of information. Through the open discussion and question rounds offered in each session, the participants also had the opportunity to address personal concerns and gain new perspectives and views. To further promote exchange and networking among young scientists, we are planning to hold the event again in the future.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all speakers and helpers once again for their time and commitment, thanks to whom we were once again able to successfully hold the event in digital format.

This year's Young Scientists' Day on November 5, 2020, was strongly influenced by the pandemic situation and focused on urgent questions concerning doctoral and academic careers

On November 5, 2020, the Day of Young Scientists at Chemnitz University of Technology took place for the seventh time. Due to the current situation, this year's event was digital for the first time. Around 70 interested young scientists took part in lectures and a virtual discussion round. The event focused on the topics "PhD", "Publishing" and "Career perspectives after the doctorate". Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Director of the Centre for Young Scientists and Vice-Rector for Research and Young Scientists at Chemnitz University of Technology, and Dr. Nadia Lois, Managing Director of the Centre for Young Scientists and Assistant (specialized in Junior Researchers and Tenure-Track-Procedure) in the President´s Office, led through the program.

As an introduction to the topic "Doctoral Studies", Dr. Nadia Lois moderated a discussion in which young researchers from different faculties talked about their own experiences during the doctorate. The focus was on various aspects and numerous tips on doctoral research strategies. Key aspects were motivation, dealing with crises, but also the joy of whole research process.

For example, Jun. Prof. Dr. Danny Kowerko from the Faculty of Computer Science advised the prospective doctoral students to remain true to the philosophy of their studies and simply continue with the next step. Dr. Maik Trautmann from the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering encouraged the audience to take the "risk of a doctorate" even if at first glance this project was considered too challenging. Kristin Eichhorn, M.A., PhD student at the Faculty of Humanities, recommended establishing one's own routines in everyday life when planning and organizing the working method. Dr. Sascha Schneider, also from the Faculty of Humanities, added that a clear definition of smaller tasks leads to becoming aware of one's own progress. Dr. Pia Cardone from the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration emphasized the importance of exchanging information with other scientists during meetings and conferences. Dr. Jens Teuscher from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology pointed out the important influence of the working climate on one's own work performance. And Dr. Franziska Nestler from the Faculty of Mathematics added that setting up regular appointments with supervisors and other colleagues would help to make use of their expertise in all areas of scientific qualification.

All speakers agreed on the importance of the exchange of ideas between colleagues, which is often neglected, especially in the currently predominant home office. Hence the tip to all (prospective) doctoral students to create routines for collegial exchange, especially in the current situation. Be it a daily virtual coffee round or a weekly jour fixe - the resulting added value is considerable.


Picture showing the online conference
This year's Day for Young Scientists took place online. The focus was on the topic "Motivation for an academic career". Photo: Screenshot (private)

The second session focused on "Successful Publishing". Angela Malz, Director of Chemnitz University Library, presented the numerous support services offered by the University Library and encouraged the audience to inquire at the library if there is a need for financial support, for example for Open Access publications. Under the motto "no pain, no gain", Prof. Dr. Markus Richter, holder of the Professorship Technical Thermodynamics at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, explained that a good scientific publication performance is linked to a lot of work and strategic research management.

Two parallel sessions were held at the end of this year's Day for Young Scientists. Prof. Dr. Anja Strobel, Dean of the Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, together with Prof. Dr. Bernhard Wunderle, holder of the Professorship Materials and Reliability of Microsystems at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, presented the course of the doctoral program from different perspectives. Prof. Dr. Anja Strobel emphasized the importance of cognitive ability, enthusiasm and curiosity for research, which accompany one on the way to a successful doctorate. Prof. Dr. Bernhard Wunderle added that these qualities interact with great determination, self-discipline and perseverance, since "geniuses are rare". He also pointed out that the doctoral thesis is "not a 9 to 5 job" and that it is therefore very important to have fun with it.

At the same time, Prof. Dr. Marlen Gabriele Arnold, Faculty of Economics as well as Rectorate Representative for Sustainable Campus Development, and Dr. Robin Schubert, graduate of Chemnitz University of Technology and now Managing Director of BASELABS GmbH, spoke about two possible career paths after the doctorate. Prof. Arnold focused on various aspects that should be considered if one wants to stay in academia after the doctorate and obtain a professorship. Stays abroad and the building of networks are helpful. The hurdles to be overcome were also mentioned. She referred to the increasing pressure to publish, which is a hurdle for many. She advised not to despair, to have staying power and thus find their way through the "publication jungle". As an engineer, Dr. Robin Schubert set out on the road to founding a company. He explained this in a vivid way and provided insights into his discovery phase. In doing so, he particularly emphasized the importance of motivation. In particular the question he asked himself in the morning: "Why am I working today", he wanted to share with his audience.

In the end, despite the wide range of experiences and perspectives, all the speakers agreed on one thing: intrinsic motivation is the essential driving force for a successful doctorate and career - whether in or outside science. You have work on your research topic and project with passion.

"The Day for Young Scientists has also proved its worth in the virtual format", said Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann in the end of the event. Dr. Nadia Lois was finished with the words: "I am particularly pleased that the Day for Young Scientists had with such a great response despite the unusual format and that it was possible to discuss so many interesting topics regarding the doctorate process.

We would like to thank all the speakers and all the helpers for their time and commitment, thanks to which we were able to successfully hold the event in digital format as well.

"You have to be passionate about your research topic."

For the sixth time, the Centre for Young Scientists invited all persons interested - from Master's students to supervisors - to inform oneself and exchange views on academic career paths. More than 85 participants joined this year’s Day for Young Scientists and attended informative lectures, field reports or they took the possibility to get directly in touch with the representatives of the faculties.

For many participants, the anchored discussion “Young Scientists get the floor” was one of the highlights of the event. During this discussion, young scientists - doctoral candidates and postdocs from different faculties - had their say. .

Displayed from left to right: Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Dr. Ailyn Sötzner, Claas Pollmanns, Dr. Michael Partmann, Felix Petzke and Andrea Preuß.
Dr. André Matthes from the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering shared his experiences.

Various aspects, such as the decision for the doctorate, the handling of crises but also the joy of research itself were discussed. The speakers shared their experiences and gave the audience advice on the doctorate. Dr. Ailyn Stötzner of the Faculty of Mathematics suggested that not everything has to be done on one's own and that doctoral candidates should use the expertise of their supervisors. Felix Petzke, doctoral candidate at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, recommended to seize impulses from the outside - whether those of colleagues during coffee breaks, during colloquia or at conferences. Dr.André Matthes of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering encouraged the participants to take their time to search for a research topic in order to make sure to identify the topic they are really interested in. In addition, Andrea Preuß of the Faculty of Natural Science shared her experience with scholarships and Claas Pollmanns of the Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences brought his personal views on a structured doctorate into the conversation. The discussion was anchored by Dr. Michael Partmann, Assistant to the president of Chemnitz University of Technology.

The fact that enthusiasm for the research topic and scientific work is fundamental for a doctorate was also confirmed by Prof. Dr. Frank-Lothar Kroll of the Faculty of Humanities and Prof. Dr. Bernhard Wunderle of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology. They presented the formal requirements for a doctorate with all its milestones. The presentation included specifics of humanities and social science as well as an engineering perspective. Prof. Dr. Wunderle emphasised that one’s personal motivation and being passionate about every aspect of the topic matter the most.

Prof. Dr. Frank-Lothar Kroll answered ten key questions on the doctorate during his presentation
Prof. Dr. Bernhard Wunderle presented the specifics of a doctorate in engineering.

Afterwards, Antje Pfeifer from the Centre for Young Scientists presented financing possibilities for the doctorate.

At the same time, Prof. Dr. Birgit Glorius from the Faculty of Humanities gave an insight in her academic career, which led her - as she said - via detours to her goal. She pointed out that there is not one ideal way. One could and should decide several times which way to go. One should always strive to become unique within its own discipline and to put this unique selling point in the focus of your career decisions. Prof. Glorius considers publishing, acquiring third-party funds, teaching, self-marketing and networking as basics of academic work.

Prof. Dr. Birgit Glorius: Via detours to the goal.
Dr. Martin Böhringer: How a failed research project accidentally turned into a start-up..

Dr. Martin Böhringer, who completed his doctorate at the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, reported on how accidentally the startup Staffbase arose from a failed research project. He advised the audience to never get too comfortable with one’s situation and not to lose contact with the outside world. Sometimes things should just be tackled and done - perfection not necessarily comes first. Failures should rather be seen as a new opportunity and one should strive to quickly overcome them. With his lecture, he encouraged the participants to admit their own mistakes and made clear that even seemingly wrong decisions can lead to the goal.

In the last presentation, Dr. Michael Melzer informed the participants about his personal career - from doctoral candidate to junior research group leader at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden. He also gave the audience insights into the promotion of young talents within the Leibniz Association. As one example, he presented the competition The best minds, which offers - in addition to the programme for Leibniz Junior Research Groups - funding for outstanding female junior researchers – the so-called Programme for Women Professors.

The coffee break was an opportunity to exchange views with each other and with the representatives of the faculties.
Dr. Michael Melzer: Best Practice in promoting young scientists

One aspect all the speakers agreed on: one has to work passionately on the doctorate, enjoy scientific work and academic exchange and has to be dedicated to one’s topic!

Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Vice President for Research and Junior Researchers, who led through the programme, said afterwards: "I am pleased that so many Master students showed interest in the topic of doctorate at the Chemnitz University of Technology." The participants in this year's Day of Young Scientists appreciated the diverse perspectives on the doctorate, the wide range of presented topics and were inspired by the enthusiasm of the speakers.

We thank all the speakers, moderators, representatives of the faculties and all the helpers for their time and dedication, thanks to which we were able to successfully organise the event.

(Author: Antje Pfeifer, Translation: Lea Müllenbach, Pictures: Anja Huber and Lea Müllenbach)

Doctorate, research and the promotion of young scientists

On Thursday, 2 November 2017, numerous doctoral candidates, interested students, postdocs as well as professors assembled on the campus “Straße der Nationen” in order to participate in the 5 Day for Young Scientists. During this afternoon, everything revolved arount the doctorate, research and the promotion of young academics.

The event was opened by Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Vice President for Research and Young Scientists and Director of the Centre for Young Scientist. After a short welcome and an introduction to the agenda Dr.-Ing. Jens Teuscher (Commissioner of the University Management for Young Scientists) continued. The young scientist introduced himself and his function as a link between young academics and University Management.

Afterwards young scientists of Chemnitz University of Technology (TU Chemnitz) gave insights into their doctorate. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Mario Geißler from the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Dr.-Ing. Jens Teuscher from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Dr. Marcus Korb from the Faculty of Natural Sciences, Michael Mika from the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Nadine Rauh from the Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences were part of the panel.

Under discussion Michael Mika, Dr. Marcus Korb, Dr. Michael Partmann, Nadine Rauh, Jun.-Prof. Dr. Mario Geißler und Dr.-Ing. Jens Teuscher (from left to right)

For Jun.-Prof. Geißler and Nadine Rauh, the main motivation for the doctorate was the joy of doing research and academic work. Dr. Jens Teuscher pointed out the importance of additional experiences that may come with a doctorate: The first working experiences in teaching and projects, participation in conferences and the development of key competences. Furthermore, the panel discussed how to handle setbacks during the doctorate. Dr. Marcus Korb emphasized, that based on his experiences, the exchange with colleagues and fellow PhDs as well as the participation in conferences gave him new ideas and impulses for his work and helped him overcome setbacks. But the most important – everyone agreed on – is not to give up. The discussion was moderated by Dr. Michael Partmann, Assistant to the University Management in University politics and University development.

Afterwards the former president of Fraunhofer Society, Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Bullinger, gave a speech entitled “Career step: Applied Sciences”. He introduced Fraunhofer Society and pointed out the career possibilities and target group-specific funding programmes for young scientists. For example, the career programme “step forward” supports the career planning of Fraunhofer´s staff that already acquired working experience. Fraunhofer Society is the biggest organisation for applied research in Europe. It serves as career-stepping stone in business and science. Prof. Bullinger’s advice to the audience was that the most important step of a dissertation is to start with it.

Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann and Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Bullinger discussing open questions after the presentation on „Career Step: Applied Sciences“.

After the first session, the approx. 90 participants were invited to a coffee break. A poster exhibition informed about the promotion possibilities at the faculties of TU Chemnitz.

Information material on financing the doctorate
Posters of the faculties on doing a doctorate
The coffee break offered possibilities for exchange

The second session started with three presentations which took place at the same time and were orientated at the specific group interests. Prof. Dr. Dietrich R.T. Zahn from the Faculty of Natural Sciences focused on the typical process of a dissertation with its major milestones. Antje Pfeifer from the Centre for Young Scientists introduced different options how to finance the doctorate.

Anja Ruhland, M.A. from the Federal Government’s "Research and Innovation" central funding-advisory centre was responsible of the second presentation concerning the funding possibilities for research and development projects by the Federal Government. She presented the programmes “VIP+” and “KMU-innovativ” and marked the most important steps from the project idea to the finalised proposal.

Furthermore, Prof. Dr. Georgeta Salvan from the Faculty of Natural Sciences introduced during her presentation „The life after PhD: an ongoing experiment” her individual career steps before, during and after the doctorate.

Prof. Dr. Dietrich R.T. Zahn: Major milestones during the PhD
Anja Ruhland, M.A.: funding possibilities by the the Federal Government
Prof. Dr. Georgeta Salvan: career after the PhD

As last year, the Day for Young Scientist ended with a Science Slam. Three doctoral candidates and one postdoc battled each other. Christian Militzer from the Faculty of Natural Sciences explained in his talk how to cover spaghetti to a maximum with tomato sauce and why this is important to him as a scientist. Annett Schmieder from the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering gave insights into the life of a fibre rope and the problem of split ends. Apoorva Sharma from the Faculty of Natural Sciences explained which impact spintronic have on a draft beer. After all, Dr. Holger Langenau from the Faculty of Mathematics presented how a hardhard problem can be solved with the help of square chocolates.

Winning presentation by Christian Militzer
Science Slamer Annett Schmieder
Third place Apoorva Sharma
Second place Dr. Holger Langenau

The audience decided who should win. All four candidates received great applause for their presentations but ultimately Christian Militzer emerged as winner of the Science Slam.
Dr. Holger Langenau was second and Apoorva Sharma third. We would like to thank “Gesellschaft der Freunde der TU Chemnitz e.V”. Only through their generous support we were able to present attractive prizes to the winners.

Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann: Thanksgiving and invitation to the reception

After the closing by Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann the official part of this year's Day for Young Scientists ended. There were still plenty of opportunities to exchange views during the reception. Remaining outstanding questions about the doctorate were answered by six representatives of the faculties.

The Centre for Young Scientists thanks all the speakers, moderators, participants of the Science Slam, as well as helpers involved in the event for their support.

(Author: Antje Pfeifer, Translation: Lea Müllenbach, Pictures: Anja Huber and Lea Müllenbach)

A DAY FOR YOUNG SCIENTISTS

On 19 November 2016 the Day for Young Scientists took place for the fourth time at the TU Chemnitz. The Centre for Young Scientists (ZfwN) organized the event and invited doctoral students as well as professors, postdocs and interested students in general to a joint afternoon revolving around the topic of completing a doctorate.

Overall 120 interested people including professors and juniorprofessors, students, postdocs, doctoral students and staff from all faculties came to hear a number of informative and professional presentations.

Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann opened the event at 2pm by welcoming the guests in the full auditorium N113 on the campus Reichenhainer Straße. He also introduced himself as the new director of the Center for Young Scientists and used the opportunity to thank his predecessor Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang, who had prepared significant parts of the program for the day. Afterwards he explained the topics of the day by walking the audience through the items on the agenda.

Opening and welcoming speech: Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Vice President for Research and Junior Researchers & director of the Centre for Young Scientists
Opening and welcoming speech: Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann, Vice President for Research and Junior Researchers & director of the Centre for Young Scientists

The first presentation was held by Prof. Dr. Michael Schreiber, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Professorship of Theoretical Physics III - Theory of Disordered Systems. The title was „How to Write a World Class Paper“. He opened by saying that he would answer that question indefinitely. He furthermore offered a multitude of helpful tips and experience in academic writing.

The following two presentations aimed mainly at parties interested in starting a doctoral thesis. Professor Ihlemann presented a possible timeline for a doctoral process including its important milestones. Afterwards information about numerous financing models were presented. In this part Antje Pfeifer, employee of the ZfwN and project coordinator for InProTUC explained a variety of options.

Presentation  „How to Write a World Class Paper" Prof. Dr. Michael Schreiber
Presentation „How to Write a World Class Paper" Prof. Dr. Michael Schreiber
Presentation of the doctoral process: Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann
Presentation of the doctoral process: Prof. Dr. Jörn Ihlemann
Options for financing a doctorate: Antje Pfeifer
Options for financing a doctorate: Antje Pfeifer

The next part focused on research done at TU Chemnitz. Alexandra Cook, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Science, Professorship of Organisational and Economic Psychology, held a 10 minute-presentation about her own doctoral thesis as well as the advantages of working at the university while getting a PhD. Her enthusiasm was quit noticeable for the audience. Consequently, she closed on the take-home-message: Love Your Research.

An insight into everyday research at TU Chemnitz: Doctoral student Alexandra Cook, Faculty for Behavioral and Social Science
An insight into everyday research at TU Chemnitz: Doctoral student Alexandra Cook, Faculty for Behavioral and Social Science

This first block of presentations was followed by a short coffee break where the guests had the chance to talk to the participants, take a look at information on display as well as take home brochures and learn about the PhD programs at specific faculties. Nearly all faculties of TU Chemnitz were represented one a poster.

Get-together
Get-together
Information material about doctoral programs and funding possibilities
Information material about doctoral programs and funding possibilities
Poster presentation of the faculties of TU Chemnitz
Poster presentation of the faculties of TU Chemnitz

The seconde half of the event had the theme „Promotion of Young Scientists“. It was a pleasure for the ZfwN to welcome Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl of the Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max-Planck-Society as a speaker. His presentation gave the audience an insight into his research as well as his philosophy about supporting his doctoral students. He pointed out that the doctoral process is an intensive time and an important station within a scientific career. He asks everybody to consider moving on after finishing the PhD and gain as much experience as possible. He puts a main focus on discipline, self- responsibility and time management. He said he urges his own doctoral students to finish their thesis in 3 to max. 4 years. Through constant personal conversations he motivates and supports them in this.

Supporting young scientists: Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl, Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max-Planck-Society
Supporting young scientists: Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl, Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max-Planck-Society

Afterwards Clemence Vernier, doctoral student at TU Chemnitz as well as employee at Robert Bosch GmbH, and Martin Gozdzik, also doctoral student as well as employee at Volkswagen AG told the audience about “Promotion of Young Scientists” from the perspective of doctoral students working at a company. Clemence Vernier saw the main advantages of this PhD model within the support the company offered to the doctoral community and the inclusion of her research topic in the company’s budget. Therefor she did not have to write requests for additional funding like she would have at a university.
Martin Gozdzik pointed out some advantages as well but also noted that the workload he faces as an employee does not leave enough room to work on his thesis on a daily bases.
He also said that his employer offered great chances of being taken on by the company when doctoral students successfully finished their PhD.
Dr. Florian Speck, Postdoc of TU Chemnitz and member of the advisory board for the ZfwN moderated this part of the event.

 

„Promotion of Young Scientists“: Doctoral student Martin Gozdzik
„Promotion of Young Scientists“: Doctoral student Martin Gozdzik
„Promotion of Young Scientists“: Dr. Florian Speck (TU Chemnitz) in discussion with doctoral student Clemence Vernier
„Promotion of Young Scientists“: Dr. Florian Speck (TU Chemnitz) in discussion with doctoral student Clemence Vernier
„Promotion of Young Scientists“: An insight into the economy and the daily research of doctoral students working in companies.
„Promotion of Young Scientists“: An insight into the economy and the daily research of doctoral students working in companies.

The event ended with a Science Slam. Four young scientists competed with one another using their research topics. The goal was to delight the audience with the own research topic presented in a 7-minute short presentation. Moderator Antonin Fischer, graduate of TU Chemnitz and passionate Poetry- and Science-Slam moderator, explained the rules and warmed up the audience. First candidate: Sebastian Weise, Faculty Mechanical Engineering. In his presentation he clearly conveyed what tribology is and where to find it – even in one’s bedroom. Second candidate: Dr. Freddy Sichting, Faculty for Behavioral and Social Science. He compared a symphony orchestra to a human foot in both acoustical and visual manner as well as what all of that had to do with Rainer Calmund. Third candidate: Ibrahim Ali, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering. His core findings: Yes, aluminum in aircraft turbines can work! Fourth candidate: Dr. Holger Langenau, Faculty of Mathematics. His presentation lead to through numerous mathematical formulas. Even though the mystery of mathematical formulas remained for some of the audience members, the presentation was quite interesting.
All four presentations were met by enthusiastic applause. The trained ear of the moderator identified thereby the first two winners. 1st place Dr. Freddy Sichting, 2nd place: Ibrahim Ali. At this point, much appreciation is also due to the community of the friends of TU Chemnitz. Thanks to their support the first two winners got handed great prices for their work. For the first place it was a tablet by Samsung and for the second place a voucher for the bookstore Universitas.

Moderator Science Slam: Antonin Fischer
Moderator Science Slam: Antonin Fischer
Candidate Science Slam: Sebastian Weise
Candidate Science Slam: Sebastian Weise
1<sup>st</sup> place presentation by Dr. Freddy Sichting
1st place presentation by Dr. Freddy Sichting
2<sup>nd</sup> place: Ibrahim Ali
2nd place: Ibrahim Ali
Candidate Science Slam: Dr. Holger Langenau
Candidate Science Slam: Dr. Holger Langenau
Applause from the audience for all participants
Applause from the audience for all participants

The final reception was then used again to network and to get in contact with the participants, the speakers and other guests.

The ZfwN thanks all speakers, moderators, Science-Slam-participants and helpers for their active support. Through them this event was made possible to begin with.

The next event like this one is planned for november 2017.

(Text: Marita Sohre, graphs: Jule Burgenger)

Review 2015

On 19 November 2015 the Day for Young Scientists took place for the third time. The event addressed the topics of "Good scientific practice", "Structured doctorate" and "Best practice". Between the presentations of experts, the young scientists had various occasions for an exchange with the speakers and among one another.

The speakers answered the queries of the young academics
PHOTO: Anne Fritzsch / The speakers answered the queries of the young academics.

The event carried out by the Centre for young Scientists (ZfwN) addressed PhD students, Postdocs and prospective doctoral candidates at TU Chemnitz, at Hochschule Mittweida and Zwickau. With this event, TU Chemnitz aims to form a culture and identity of the young scientists. Furthermore, it is the goal to increase the visibility of the group of junior scientists through measures across faculties and to contribute to the facilitation of a university-wide culture of postgraduates. The event delivered initial insights into the topic of doing a doctorate within an informal scope. Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang, Vice-Rector for Research and Young Scientists as well as the director of the ZfwN, emphasized the considerable role of the young scientists for TU Chemnitz within his short welcoming speech: 'Technische Universität Chemnitz feels constrained for the advancement of young scientists through the establishment of optimal framework conditions. This is anchored in the extrapolation of the development plan of TU Chemnitz until 2025 respectively. The young scientists contribute to the success of research at TU Chemnitz and therefore they are of particular importance for the TU.'

The first section of topics was dedicated to the protection of good scientific practice. Prof. Dr. Brigitte Jockusch deployed by the Deutsche Forschergemeinschaft (DFG) in the committee of ombudsmen for science reported on the exposure to suspected cases of scientific misbehaviour. She referred to the basic principles of good scientific practice of DFG and appealed to the young scientists to comply with these principles in their daily work. Her presentation was complemented by the ombudsman of TU Chemnitz, Prof. Dr. Guntram Wagner, who presented the structures and the procedures at TU Chemnitz.
In the second part of the afternoon Dr. Wolfgang Leidholdt gave insights into the life and the career of a technocrat. Afterwards Prof. Dr. Bernadette Malinowski, dean of Faculty of Humanities, and Tina Horlitz, postgraduate in the subject of New German and Comparative Literary Studies, presented the progress of the workgroup "Structural doctorate". This workgroup started one year ago and has concentrated on designing formats and concepts for an implementation regarding to the structural doctorate at the Faculty of Humanities. Part of this is the establishment of a portal for PhD students, the elaboration of an agreement of supervision and last but not least the modification of the doctoral degree regulations which should enable the young scientists to select the path of the structural doctorate rather than the classical individual-related doctorate in the future. Prof. Malinowski presented the advantages of such a structural doctorate, which has been of great interest to the participants. Jeanette Hilger, master student of pedagogics with the core subject of learning culture, considers a PhD after completing her studies. She said: 'The presentation of Prof. Malinowski showed the advantages and disadvantages of a structural doctorate quite plainly and piqued my interest - especially as student at the Faculty of Humanities.'

After the presentations of the experts there has been time for some interesting conversations between the speakers and the participants of the event.

After her presentation Prof. Dr Brigitte M. Jockusch answered questions of the audience
PHOTO: Anne Fritzsch / After her presentation Prof. Dr Brigitte M. Jockusch answered questions of the audience
Direct exchange with the speakers between the presentations of between the presentations of picture - Prof. Dr. Guntram Wagner)
PHOTO: Anne Fritzsch / Direct exchange with the speakers between the presentations of between the presentations of picture - Prof. Dr. Guntram Wagner)
The format of the event provided an adequate framework for the questions of PhD students and interested persons doing a doctorate
PHOTO: Anne Fritzsch / The format of the event provided an adequate framework for the questions of PhD students and interested persons doing a doctorate
After the break Dr. Wolfgang Leidholdt gave insights into his academic career with numerous exhibits
PHOTO: Anne Fritzsch / After the break Dr. Wolfgang Leidholdt gave insights into his academic career with numerous exhibits
Prof. Dr. Thomas Lampke, Dr. Dr. Wolfgang Leidholdt and Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang (left to right) in a conversation
FOTO: Anne Fritzsch / Prof. Dr. Thomas Lampke, Dr. Dr. Wolfgang Leidholdt and Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang (left to right) in a conversation
Information boards by the faculties gave insights into the main research topics at TU Chemnitz
PHOTO: Anne Fritzsch / Information boards by the faculties gave insights into the main research topics at TU Chemnitz

Review 25 and 26 September 2014

After the first Day for Young Scientists had received such a great echo, the second edition took place on 25 and 26 September 2014. About 60 doctoral students, postdocs, and also MSc-students took the opportunity to inform themselves during presentations, e.g. on career options of young scientists, on funding opportunities and financial options, on the academic career abroad and on alternatives to a career in higher education. Similar to the first Day for Young Scientists, the feedback of the participants was very positive. Especially, the variety of topics and information as well as the integration of other doctoral students i.e. in a panel discussion was notably commended. See the program of 2014 once again.

Forum on funding opportunities and financial options for PhDs, and prospective doctoral candidates<
Forum on funding opportunities and financial options for PhDs, and prospective doctoral candidates
Welcoming Speech by Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang, Vice-Rector for Research and Young Scientists
Welcoming Speech by Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang, Vice-Rector for Research and Young Scientists
Panel Discussion on alternatives to an academic career
Panel Discussion on alternatives to an academic career

The event was accompanied by the exhibition “Doing a doctorate in the past and these days”. This exhibition referred to contemporary witnesses and showed impressions of doctorates at TU Chemnitz from 1961 until today.

Tag des wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses 2014 - Ausstellung
Tag des wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses 2014 - Kuchen
Tag des wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses 2014 - Pause

The second Day for Young Scientists already started on the eve of 25 September at “Altes Heizhaus” with a Science Slam and the ceremony awarding the photo competition “Me and my doctoral thesis”. The winner of the Science Slam presented complex academic issues in a comprehensible manner to the audience.

Award ceremony of the photo competition
Award ceremony of the photo competition
Sciene Slam
Sciene Slam
Andrej-Kogan - jazz quartet
Andrej-Kogan - jazz quartet

This year's submissions to the photo competition figuratively illustrated the great variety of research topics chosen by doctoral candidates as well as typical situations, in which doctoral students may find themselves.

1<sup>st</sup> place: Ariane Bartkoswki - History vs. Hysteria
1st place: Ariane Bartkowski
'History vs. Hysteria'
2<sup>nd</sup> place: Sebastian Weise - The big throw
2nd place: Sebastian Weise
'The big throw'
3<sup>rd</sup> place: Stefan Löhr - Burning money of closed fonds
3rd place: Stefan Löhr
'Burning money of closed fonds'

The winner of the photo competition "Me and my doctoral thesis" - Ariane Bartkowski - with the picture "History vs. Hysteria" won a voucher worth 150 Euros, which was sponsored by Gesellschaft der Freunde der TU Chemnitz and is redeemable at the book shop Universitas. We thank all participants of the photo competition and the Science Slam as well as all participants and contributors of the second Day for Young Scientists.

Review 26th September 2013

It was long-overdue to dedicate a special day to PhD students, postdocs and junior professors at TU Chemnitz and to recognize their accomplishment in teaching and research. It has always been and still is the intention to offer a wide range of relevant information to young academics and support them through qualification and consultation services. Finally, the aim is to sustainably shape a culture of the young academics at TU Chemnitz and to contribute to creating an identity. Under the management of Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang, Vice-Rector for Research and Young Scientists, the 'Forschungsakademie', together with the project 'Kompetenzschule', organized the Day for Young Scientists on 26th September 2013 for the first time. The target audience was not only PhD students from TU Chemnitz, but also postdocs and postgraduates intending to take a doctoral degree. The concept was developed in cooperation with the university management and the deans of all faculties.

The ceremony of appreciation

The focus in the morning session was an appreciation of the research efforts of the academics who finished their doctorate at TU Chemnitz from January 2012 to June 2013. The Vice-Rector for Research and Young Scientists and the representatives of the faculties jointly performed the ceremonial appreciation. The ceremony was framed by three presentations of PhD students giving insights into their transdisciplinary research.

Workshops, presentations, discussions

PhD students, postdocs and prospective doctoral candidates had the opportunity to inform themselves during three workshops on the topic "A career in science and business", to participate in discussions or to get expert advice. Numerous information desks offered information on the training and consultation offers at TU Chemnitz, stimulated discussions and made new contacts possible.

Workshops, Vorträ und Diskussionen: Workshop
Workshops, Vorträ und Diskussionen: Präsentation
Workshops, Vorträ und Diskussionen: Infostand

 

Exhibition 'Doing a doctorate in the past and these days'

Exhibition

While visiting the exhibition, interested persons had the possibility to take a journey back to the beginnings of the right to confer doctorates at TU Chemnitz. Older and new doctoral theses were exhibited and visitors had the chance to compare older doctoral degree regulations with newer ones.

 

Photo competition 'Me and my doctoral thesis'

The aim of the competition was to gather creative photos and funny snapshots which tell personal and powerful stories of the own doctoral thesis. Several submissions have been received. The award ceremony of the photo competition as well as the opening of the photo exhibition, which were supplemented by a similar competition of the Leipzig Research Academy, took place in the late afternoon. We would like to thank Gesellschaft der Freunde der TU Chemnitz for providing us with the prize money of 300 Euros in total. In the future, the photo competition should take place annually. In this way, the doctorate at TU Chemnitz is also connected to personal experiences, faces and stories. In order to create an identity and culture of graduation, the competition represents the variety of research topics.

Our awardees

 

1<sup>st</sup> place: Felix Erler - Interview partner for Doctoral thesis wanted
1st place: Felix Erler
'Interview partner for Doctoral thesis wanted'
2<sup>nd</sup> place: Qinghai Shi - Me and my cable diagnose
2nd place: Qinghai Shi
'Me and my cable diagnose'
3<sup>rd</sup> place: Sebastian Weise - Dead end road
3rd place: Sebastian Weise
'Dead end road'

Get-together with the Andrej Kogan Jazz quartet Chemnitz

Get-together
Get-together
Get-together

We thank all who have contributed to a successful premiere through his/her participation and organisation.

Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang
Annett Schädlich   Dr. Daniela Menzel
Vice-Rector for
Research and Young Scientists
Head of
Forschungsakademie
Project Manager
Kompetenzschule

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