Prof. Dr. Georg Jahn | Professorship | Applied Geropsychology and Cognition | Psychology | Behavioural and Social Sci… | TU Chemnitz

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Applied Geropsychology and Cognition
Prof. Dr. Georg Jahn


Prof. Dr. Georg Jahn

Portrait: Prof. Dr. Georg Jahn
Prof. Dr. Georg Jahn
  • Phone:
    +49 371 531-36338
  • Fax:
    +49 371 531-836338
  • Email:
  • Address:
    Wilhelm-Raabe-Straße 43, 09120 Chemnitz
  • Room:
    4/112A (new: B02.112.1)

 

Research interests

  • Cognitive Ergonomics
  • Measurement of Mental Workload
  • Skill Acquisition with Human-Machine-Interfaces
  • Eye Tracking for Process Tracing (Memory Indexing)
  • Multiple Object Tracking
  • Diagnostic Reasoning
  • Spatial Cognition

CV

  • since 2016: Professorship for Applied Geropsychology and Cognition
  • 2014 – 2016: Professorship for Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics, University of Lübeck
  • 2008 – 2014: Junior Professorship for Cognitive Psychology, University of Greifswald
  • 2013: Habilitation (Venia legendi Psychology), Chemnitz University of Technology
  • 2012: Deputy Professorship for Cognitive Psychology with pedagogical-psychological Application Focus, University of Paderborn
  • 2005 – 2008: Research Associate at the Professorship for Cognitive and Engineering Psychology, Chemnitz University of Technology
  • 2003 – 2005: Research Associate at the Transregional DFG Collaborative Research Centre „Spatial Cognition“ (DFG SFB/TR8) at the Department for Cognitive Science, University of Freiburg
  • 2004 – 2005: Research Stay at Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen
  • 2003 – 2004: Research Stay at Department of Psychology, Princeton University
  • 2001 – 2003: Research Associate (Project Management) in BASt-Project „Kompetenzerwerb im Umgang mit Fahrerassistenz- und -informationssystemen“ Chemnitz University of Technology
  • 2001: Doctorate (Dr. phil.) in Psychology, University of Regensburg
  • 1997 – 2001: Research Associate at the Professorship for General Psychology and Clinical Psychology, University of Regensburg

Publications

In Journals (peer-reviewed)

Scholz, A., Krems, J.F., & Jahn, G. (2017). Watching diagnoses develop: Eye movements reveal symptom processing during diagnostic reasoning. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 24, 1398-1412. doi:10.3758/s13423-017-1294-8

Papenmeier, F., Meyerhoff, H. S., Brockhoff, A., Jahn, G., & Huff, M. (2017). Upside-down: Perceived space affects object-based attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 43, 1269-1274. doi:10.1037/xhp0000421

Berneiser, J., Jahn, G., Grothe, M., & Lotze, M. (2018). From visual to motor strategies: Training in mental rotation of hands. Neuroimage, 167, 247-255. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.06.014

Rebitschek, F., Krems, J. F., & Jahn, G. (2016). The diversity effect in diagnostic reasoning. Memory & Cognition, 44, 789-805. doi:10.3758/s13421-016-0592-0

Meyerhoff. H. S., Papenmeier, F., Jahn, G., & Huff, M. (2016). Not FLEXible enough: Exploring the temporal dynamics of attentional reallocations with the multiple object tracking paradigm. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 42, 776-787. doi:10.1037/xhp0000187

Brockhoff, A., Papenmeier, F., Wolf, K., Pfeiffer, T., Jahn, G., & Huff, M. (2016). Viewpoint matters: Exploring the involvement of reference frames in multiple object tracking from a developmental perspective. Cognitive Development, 37, 1-8. doi:10.1016/j.cogdev.2015.10.004

Krüger, M., & Jahn, G. (2015). Children’s spatial representations: 3- and 4-year-olds are affected by irrelevant peripheral references. Frontiers in Psychology, 6:1677. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01677

Rebitschek, F., Bocklisch, F., Scholz, A., Krems, J. F., & Jahn, G. (2015). Biased processing of ambiguous symptoms favors the initially leading hypothesis in sequential diagnostic reasoning. Experimental Psychology, 62, 287-305. doi:10.1027/1618-3169/a000298

Rebitschek, F., Krems, J. F., & Jahn, G. (2015). Memory activation of multiple hypotheses in sequential diagnostic reasoning. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 27, 780-796. doi:10.1080/20445911.2015.1026825

Meyerhoff. H. S., Papenmeier, F., Jahn, G., & Huff, M (2015). Distractor locations influence multiple object tracking beyond interobject spacing: Evidence from equidistant distractor displacements. Experimental Psychology, 62, 170-180. doi:10.1027/1618-3169/a000283

Jahn, G., & Braatz, J. (2014). Memory indexing of sequential symptom processing in diagnostic reasoning. Cognitive Psychology, 68, 59-97. doi:10.1016/j.cogpsych.2013.11.002

Papenmeier, F., Meyerhoff, H. S., Jahn, G., & Huff, M. (2014). Tracking by location and features: Object correspondence across spatiotemporal discontinuities during multiple object tracking. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 40(1), 159-171. doi:10.1037/a0033117

Jahn, G., & Krems, J. F. (2013). Skill acquisition with text-entry interfaces: Particularly older users benefit from minimized information-processing demands. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 32, 605-626. doi:10.1177/0733464811433485

Meyerhoff, H. S., Papenmeier, F., Jahn, G., & Huff, M. (2013). A single unexpected change in target- but not distractor motion impairs multiple object tracking. i-Perception, 4(1), 81-83. doi:10.1068/i0567sas

Pau, S., Jahn, G., Sakreida, K., Domin, M., & Lotze, M. (2013). Encoding and recall of finger sequences in experienced pianists compared with musically naive controls: A combined behavioral and functional imaging study. NeuroImage, 64, 379-387. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.09.012

Renkewitz, F., & Jahn, G. (2012). Memory Indexing: A novel method for tracing memory processes in complex cognitive tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 38, 1622-1639. doi:10.1037/a0028073

Schaer, K., Jahn, G., & Lotze, M. (2012). fMRI-activation during drawing a naturalistic or sketchy portrait. Behavioural Brain Research, 233, 209-216. doi:10.1016/j.bbr.2012.05.009

Jahn, G., Wendt, J., Lotze, M., Papenmeier, F., & Huff, M. (2012). Brain activation during spatial updating and attentive tracking of moving targets. Brain and Cognition, 78, 105-113. doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2011.12.001

Jahn, G., Papenmeier, F., Meyerhoff, H. S., & Huff, M. (2012). Spatial reference in multiple object tracking. Experimental Psychology, 59, 163-173. doi:10.1027/1618-3169/a000139

Meyerhoff, H. S., Huff, M., Papenmeier, F., Jahn, G., & Schwan, S. (2011). Continuous visual cues trigger automatic spatial target updating in dynamic scenes. Cognition, 121, 73-82. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2011.06.001

Huff, M., Papenmeier, F., Jahn, G., & Hesse, F. W. (2010). Eye movements across viewpoint changes in multiple object tracking. Visual Cognition, 18, 1368-1391. doi:10.1080/13506285.2010.495878

Huff, M., Meyerhoff, H. S., Papenmeier, F., & Jahn, G. (2010). Spatial updating of dynamic scenes: Tracking multiple invisible objects across viewpoint changes. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 72, 628-636. doi:10.3758/APP.72.3.628

Jahn, G., Krems, J. F., & Gelau, C. (2009). Skill acquisition while interacting with in-vehicle information systems: Interface design determines the level of safety-relevant distractions. Human Factors, 51, 136-151. doi:10.1177/0018720809336542

Huff, M., Jahn, G., & Schwan, S. (2009). Tracking multiple objects across abrupt viewpoint changes. Visual Cognition, 17, 297-306. doi:10.1080/13506280802061838

Jahn, G., Knauff, M., & Johnson-Laird, P. N. (2007). Preferred mental models in reasoning about spatial relations. Memory & Cognition, 35, 2075-2087. doi:10.3758/BF03192939

Jahn, G., Oehme, A., Krems, J. F., & Gelau, C. (2005). Peripheral detection as a workload measure in driving: Effects of traffic complexity and route guidance system use in a driving study. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 8, 255-275. doi:10.1016/j.trf.2005.04.009

Jahn, G. (2004). Three turtles in danger: Spontaneous construction of causally relevant spatial situation models. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 30, 969-987. doi:10.1037/0278-7393.30.5.969

In Anthologies (peer-reviewed)

Kupffer, R., Wutzler, M., Krems, J. F., & Jahn, G. (2018). A comparison of a smartphone app and a wrist-worn fitness tracker for self-monitoring of physical activity by older and younger users. In B. Guidi, L. Ricci, C. Calafate, O. Gaggi, & J. Marquez-Barja (eds), Smart Objects and Technologies for Social Good. GOODTECHS 2017. Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, Vol. 233 (pp. 331-341). Cham: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-76111-4_33

Jahn, G., Stahnke, R., & Rebitschek, F. G. (2014). Parallel belief updating in sequential diagnostic reasoning. In P. Bello, M. Guarini, M. McShane, & B. Scassellati (Eds.), Proceedings of the Thirty-Sixth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 2405-2410). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Rebitschek, F. G., Krems, J. F., & Jahn, G. (2014). A structure-dependent causal diversity effect in diagnostic reasoning. In P. Bello, M. Guarini, M. McShane, & B. Scassellati (Eds.), Proceedings of the Thirty-Sixth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 2829-2834). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Jahn, G., & Braatz, J. (2012). Memory indexing of sequential symptom processing in diagnostic reasoning. In N. Miyake, D. Peebles, & R. P. Cooper (Eds.), Proceedings of the Thirty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 497-502). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Rebitschek, F. G., Scholz, A., Bocklisch, F., Krems, J. F., & Jahn, G. (2012). Order effects in diagnostic reasoning with four candidate hypotheses. In N. Miyake, D. Peebles, & R. P. Cooper (Eds.), Proceedings of the Thirty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 905-910). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Jahn, G., Müller-Bardorff, M., & Coventry, K. (2011). Spatial reasoning within visible functional constraints. In L. Carlson, C. Hölscher, & T. Shipley (Eds.), Proceedings of the Thirty-Third Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 1539-1544). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Renkewitz, F., & Jahn, G. (2010). Looking at nothing indicates memory search in multiattribute decision making. In S. Ohlsson, & R. Catrambone (Eds.), Proceedings of the Thirty-Second Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 260-265). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Renkewitz, F., & Jahn, G. (2010). Tracking memory search for cue information. In A. Glöckner & C. Witteman (Eds.), Foundations for Tracing Intuition: Challenges and Methods (pp. 199-218). Hove, UK: Psychology Press.

Mehlhorn, K., & Jahn, G. (2009). Modeling sequential information integration with parallel constraint satisfaction. In N. A. Taatgen, & H. van Rijn (Eds.), Proceedings of the Thirty-First Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 2469-2474). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Jahn, G., Renkewitz, F., & Kunze, S. (2007). Heuristics in multi-attribute decision making: Effects of representation format. In D. S. McNamara, & G. Trafton (Eds.), Proceedings of the Twenty-Ninth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 383-388). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Jahn, G., Knauff, M., & Johnson-Laird, P. N. (2005). Preferred mental models in spatial reasoning. In B. G. Bara, L. W. Barsalou, & M. Bucciarelli (Eds.), Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 1036-1041). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Jahn, G., Johnson-Laird, P. N., & Knauff, M. (2004). Reasoning about consistency with spatial mental models: Hidden and obvious indeterminacy in spatial descriptions. In: C. Freksa, M. Knauff, B. Krieg-Brückner, B. Nebel, & T. Barkowsky (Eds.), Spatial Cognition IV - Reasoning, Action, Interaction. International Conference Spatial Cognition 2004, Frauenchiemsee, Germany, October 2004 (pp. 165-180). Berlin: Springer.

Jahn, G. (2003). Hybrid representation of spatial descriptions. In: F. Schmalhofer, R. M. Young, & G. Katz (Eds.), Proceedings of EuroCogSci03, The European Cognitive Science Conference 2003 (p. 401). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Jahn, G., Keinath, A., Gelau, C., & Krems, J.F. (2003). Destination entry while driving: The benefit of constrained options to act in multitask situations illustrated by two route guidance systems. In: C. Stephanidis, & J. Jacko (Eds.), Human-Computer Interaction: Theory and Practice, Part II (pp. 93-97). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Jahn, G., Krems, J.F. & Gelau, C. (2002). Skill-development when interacting with in-vehicle information systems: A training study on the learnability of different MMI concepts. In: D. de Waard, K. A. Brookhuis, J. Mooral, & A. Toffetti (Eds.), Human Factors in Transportation, Communication, Health, and the Workplace (pp. 35-48). Maastricht, NL: Shaker Publishing.

Other Publications

Jahn, G., & Henning, M. (2007). Two new textbooks on applied cognitive psychology. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 21, 551-553. doi:10.1002/acp.1277

Krems, J., Jahn, G., Baumann, M., Rösler, D., & Mogilka, A. (2005). Fahren oder gefahren werden? Möglichkeiten und Grenzen von Telematiksystemen. In K. Karrer, B. Gauss, & Chr. Steffens (Hrsg.), Beiträge zur Mensch-Maschine-Systemtechnik aus Forschung und Praxis (pp. 79-91). Düsseldorf: Symposion.

Jahn, G., & Webber, L. (2005). Aligning with a ghost: Perspective, belief, and function in spatial reasoning. Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Language and Space. Delmenhorst, Germany.

Jahn, G., Oehme, A., Rösler, D., & Krems, J. F. (2004). Kompetenzerwerb im Umgang mit Fahrerinformationssystemen. Berichte der Bundesanstalt für Straßenwesen, F 47. Bremerhaven: Wirtschaftsverlag NW.

Krems, J., Jahn, G., & Baumann, M. (2004). Wer fährt? Zu den Möglichkeiten und Grenzen von Fahrerassistenz- und Fahrerinformationssystemen. In C. Zanger, S. Habscheid, & H. Gaus (Hrsg.), Bleibt das Auto mobil? Mobilität und Automobil im interdisziplinären Diskurs (pp. 195-207). Frankfurt: Peter Lang.

Krems, J., Keinath, A., Baumann, M. & Jahn, G. (2004). Die Okklusionsmethode: Ein einfaches und valides Verfahren zur Bewertung der visuellen Beanspruchung von Zweitaufgaben? In B. Schlag (Hrsg.). Verkehrspsychologie (S. 335-339). Lengerich: Pabst.

Rösler, D., Oehme, A., Jahn, G., Baumann, M., & Krems, J. (2004). Empirische Methoden zur Erfassung der Fahrerbeanspruchung. In C. Steffens, M. Thüring, & L. Urbas (Hrsg.), Entwerfen und Gestalten. 5. Berliner Werkstatt Mensch-Maschine-Systeme (S. 307-321). Düsseldorf: VDI Verlag.

Jahn, G., Krems, J. F., & Gelau, C. (2003). Exploring skill acquisition at the performance of an in-vehicle HMI task: Influences of situational demands and HMI design. In Proceedings of the XVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association “Ergonomics in the Digital Age”, Vol. 3, Product Design (pp. 161-164). Seoul: Ergonomics Society of Korea.

Jahn, G., & Knauff, M. (2003). Raum zum Lesen: Die Konstruktion mentaler Modelle beim Verstehen narrativer Texte. In: T. Krämer-Badoni, & K. Kuhm (Hrsg.), Die Gesellschaft und ihr Raum (pp. 53-72). Leverkusen: Leske & Budrich.

Jahn, G., Krems, J.F., & Gelau, C. (2003). The 0.1 Hz component of heart rate variability (HRV) and the peripheral detection task (PDT) to measure driver workload. Journal of Psychophysiology 17(3), 156.

Baumann, M., Rösler, D., Jahn, G., & Krems, J.F. (2003). Assessing driver distraction using occlusion method and peripheral detection task. In H. Strasser, K. Kluth, H. Rausch, & H. Bubb (Eds.), Quality of Work and Products in Enterprises of the Future (pp. 53-56). Stuttgart: Ergonomia Verlag.

Gelau, C., Jahn, G., Krems, J.F., Uno, H., Kircher, A., Östlund, J., & Nilsson, L. (2003). State-of-the-art of the SNRA/JARI/BAST joint research on driver workload measurement within the framework of IHRA-ITS. Proceedings of the Eighteenth International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles (paper 242, 1-9).

Group Publications

Open Science Collaboration. (2015). Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science. Science, 349(6251). doi:10.1126/science.aac4716

Open Science Collaboration (2014). The Reproducibility Project: A model of large-scale collaboration for empirical research on reproducibility. In V. Stodden, F. Leisch, & R. Peng (Eds.), Implementing Reproducible Computational Research (A Volume in The R Series) (pp. 299-323). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.

Open Science Collaboration. (2012). An open, large-scale, collaborative effort to estimate the reproducibility of psychological science. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7, 652-655. doi:10.1177/1745691612462588

 

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